Banff Parking Proposal

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The Town of Banff is restarting the consultation of this project with Phase 2.

Please review the Phase 1 What We Heard Report and the new Revised Draft Parking Plan - Phase 2


Provide your input in the 2020 survey below, or ask a question in the Q&A tab

Parking challenges, traffic congestion, the cost to local property taxpayers, and the environmental impact associated with the millions of visitors who come to Banff by car every year continues to affect us all.

As a town limited to 4-square-kilometres in size, Banff will see parking and traffic issues increase. This

The Town of Banff is restarting the consultation of this project with Phase 2.

Please review the Phase 1 What We Heard Report and the new Revised Draft Parking Plan - Phase 2


Provide your input in the 2020 survey below, or ask a question in the Q&A tab

Parking challenges, traffic congestion, the cost to local property taxpayers, and the environmental impact associated with the millions of visitors who come to Banff by car every year continues to affect us all.

As a town limited to 4-square-kilometres in size, Banff will see parking and traffic issues increase. This proposal helps protect parking spaces for residents, while providing greater access to available parking spaces for everyone.

The proposed plan has 3 elements to the strategy:

  • residential permit parking on downtown residential streets
  • visitor-pay parking downtown
  • free, longer-stay parking in the periphery of downtown and in the Bear Street parkade


Revised Draft Parking Plan – Phase 2

A. Visitor-pay parking in the downtown core

Following feedback from residents in Phase 1, pay parking in downtown Banff is now being proposed for visitors and commuters, with free parking for residents for parking three hours in the downtown pay zone. Residents would only pay if parking longer than 3 hours of parking in the zone. Pay parking applied to visitors would still increase the availability of spaces for short-term stays. Visitors can choose to park for free in designated lots on the periphery and upper levels of the Bear Street Parkade. Charging for parking in the core would displace longer-term parking to free spaces, encourage turnover of spaces and reduce some of the congestion caused by drivers circling the streets looking for spots. Free parking zones are included in the proposed Parking Management Plan with the intention of directing long-term parkers out of the downtown area to the periphery of town. For more details on the Visitor-Pay Parking System, review the Revised Draft Parking Plan – Phase 2 document.


B. Resident Parking Permit system

The Resident Parking Permit system is designed to protect parking spaces in the general area of residents’ homes downtown and in areas adjacent to downtown (within approximately 2 blocks) that might otherwise receive “spill over” from visitors or out-of-town commuters not wanting to pay to park downtown.

The main revision is residents would not pay any fee for the resident parking permits. The revised proposal would allow unlimited resident parking permits per dwelling for the designated downtown residential streets. Visitors and non-residents would not be allowed on the designated resident-permit streets. Guest permits would be available for residents to welcome visiting friends and family.

For more details on the Resident Parking Permit System, review the Revised Draft Parking Plan – Phase 2 document.


C. Proposed parking zones

The user-pay parking zone in the revised proposal remains virtually the same as originally proposed, with minor changes to reflect existing time limits outside the downtown core. User-pay parking is proposed to apply to visitors and commuters, with residents having three hours free. No changes are proposed to area of the Resident Parking Permit zone.

  • Banff, Canmore looking at paid parking for town centres - Rocky Mountain Outlook

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    24 Nov 2019

    By: Alana MacLeod

    BOW VALLEY – Paid parking proposals are on the table for downtown Banff and Canmore as both communities continue to grapple with parking pressures and traffic troubles in the face of growing visitation.

    Town of Canmore administration is recommending moving forward with paid parking in the town centre in June 2020 to manage traffic congestion and fund free public transit, while the Town of Banff is kicking off its public engagement process this week on its paid parking proposals.

    Under the proposals, both communities have come up with a residential parking permit system.

    “It’s not intended to be onerous on the residents. We’re actually trying to come up with solutions that make residential life easier,” said Banff Mayor Karen Sorensen.

    “Traffic congestion and the impact of having four million visitors each year – with many driving around Banff looking for parking – continues to affect us all.”

    Paid parking was pitched in Canmore’s 2018 integrated parking management plan and has been a controversial topic in Banff for the better part of the last two decades.

    Banff’s proposal includes user-pay parking in the downtown core, maintaining free parking on the periphery of downtown, and adding a resident parking permit system to protect spaces in front of homes.

    Canmore’s paid parking proposal also calls for a residential permit system. Tourists could still park there for a fee, but residents would be able to register two vehicles to a property in the town centre for free, while any additional permits would be available for $100 for two years.

    Click on the headline to go to the full article
  • Whistler, Victoria launch pilot projects to make transit free for students

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    25 Nov 2019

    TIFFANY CRAWFORD Updated: November 6, 2019

    Whistler and the city of Victoria are launching pilot projects to make local transit free for secondary students.

    In Whistler, the students will be provided free bus passes for the Whistler transit system early next year, while Victoria will give youth bus passes beginning next month.

    Whistler’s plan will be funded by increasing the cost of monthly parking passes in day lots 1, 2 and 3, according to a news release from the Resort Municipality of Whistler.

    Passes for monthly parking passes will increase by $10 to $60 dollars a month.

    Whistler Mayor Jack Crompton says he encouraged students at the climate rally to take the bus, and so this plan will help them get out of their cars.

    “I want to see our ridership numbers increase so that we are forced to put more buses on the road and increase our transit service hours. Getting more people out of private passenger vehicles and onto transit is a major climate action goal here in Whistler and I know that our high school students can lead the way by taking transit,” Compton said in a statement.

    Whistler’s Family Transit Program already allows up to three children under the age of 12 to travel for free for each fare-paying adult.

    Crompton said making the switch directly helps reduce the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions in Whistler.

    Whistler did not specify a date for the pilot to start but said it would begin in early 2020.


    For full story, click on headline

  • Sylvan Lake’s visitor pay parking goes into effect soon

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    25 Nov 2019

    MEGAN ROTH May. 7, 2019

    Sylvan Lake is gearing up for another busy tourist season, and that means visitor pay parking will soon begin.

    Pay parking is in effect in Sylvan Lake everyday from May 15 to Sept. 15. Visitors to Sylvan Lake pay $2 per hour, $10 per day, or have the option of purchasing a seasonal pass for $126.50.

    Residents of Sylvan Lake can register their vehicle online for free to avoid paying when heading to the beach with their family.

    Each household can register up to four vehicles. Those who registered their vehicles in 2018 do not have to register them again this year, unless they have moved or bought a new vehicle.

    The only change to the 2019 pay parking season is the addition of a new resident-only parking area.

    The area north of 33 Street has been included as resident-only parking at the request of those living in the area.

    According to a report to Council in November 2019, residents in that area find it difficult to navigate the streets and find parking near their homes due to an increase in visitor parking, specifically in July and August.

    Town administration told Council some residents found visitors were parking on their lawns or in the ditches in the area.

    Both residents and visitors are reminded that on-street parking is limited to three hours. This is to ensure businesses in the downtown area have parking for customers throughout the day.

    There are three free parking lots downtown, as well as the three pay parking lots along Lakeshore Drive.

    This is the third year for paid visitor parking in Sylvan Lake. In 2018, the program brought in $248,382 in revenue.

    July and August are the busiest months, according to the revenue generated per month.

    More information about the paid parking program can be found on the Town’s website, www.sylvanlake.ca